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Reducing Fire Deaths and Injuries

Last October, the American Red Cross, with the endorsement of the IAFC, launched the Home Fire Campaign nationwide to reduce deaths and injuries from home fires by as much as 25% over the next five years.

The campaign heavily relies on the support of local fire departments and other community organizations to partner together and serve those most in need in their communities by installing smoke alarms, delivering life-saving fire safety education and helping residents create home-fire escape plans.

Fire chiefs around the United States have enjoyed the opportunity to serve their residents by participating in the campaign. “This program is going to make a huge impact in our community,” declared Albany (Ga.) Fire Chief Ron Rowe.

Indeed, the program has made a huge impact not only in Albany, but in nearly 2,000 cities and towns across the country. During the campaign’s first 10 months, the Red Cross and its partners have saved 15 lives, installed more than 100,000 smoke alarms and helped more than 150,000 people. The Home Fire Campaign is proud to have received DHS/FEMA Fire Prevention and Safety Grant funding.

The Albany Fire Department recently received the first Excellence in Home Fire Safety Award from the Red Cross for community leadership and community engagement in Home Fire Campaign risk-reduction efforts. Learn more about their success through the video Red Cross, IAFC Tout Community Volunteers and Partners

It's fire prevention month. Take advantage of the media lift and engage your community to become more prepared against home fires. Excellent resources are available:

It takes the whole community to maximize your reach and effectiveness, so don’t hesitate to reach out to your community partners. Chief Rowe suggests those in the fire service, “Partner up in your community with different agencies, especially if you have a chapter of the Red Cross, and put this type of program in place to reduce those injuries and deaths.”

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