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Safe Station program

Safe Stations

As of April 20th, 2017 the Safe Station program is available to individuals suffering from all forms of addiction and substance abuse, not just heroin/opioid addiction.

How The Program Works

At any time, a local resident who is the victim of addiction or substance abuse can go to any Annapolis or Anne Arundel County Police or Fire Station and request assistance.

Upon arrival to a Safe Station, the Public Safety Officer at the station will inquire about any other medical condition that may require the individual to be transported to the hospital. If transport is needed, the person will be met by the Mobile Crisis Response Team (MCRT) at the hospital. If no additional medical treatment is required, the Public Safety Officer will call the MCRT team and when they arrive at the Safe Station, they will begin their evaluation.

The MCRT is solely responsible for evaluating and determining the path of treatment.

Individuals seeking assistance will be asked if they are in possession of any weapons or drugs. If so, local law enforcement will be notified and will come to the safe station to take the custody of the items only.

The program is a cooperative effort by all levels of government.

Learn More View details
  • Topics:
    • Project: Opioid
    • Featured Opioid, Stimulant & Substance Abuse
  • Resource Type:
    • 1-pager/ summary/ infographic
  • Organizational Author:
    • External
Safe Station program

Safe Stations

As of April 20th, 2017 the Safe Station program is available to individuals suffering from all forms of addiction and substance abuse, not just heroin/opioid addiction.

How The Program Works

At any time, a local resident who is the victim of addiction or substance abuse can go to any Annapolis or Anne Arundel County Police or Fire Station and request assistance.

Upon arrival to a Safe Station, the Public Safety Officer at the station will inquire about any other medical condition that may require the individual to be transported to the hospital. If transport is needed, the person will be met by the Mobile Crisis Response Team (MCRT) at the hospital. If no additional medical treatment is required, the Public Safety Officer will call the MCRT team and when they arrive at the Safe Station, they will begin their evaluation.

The MCRT is solely responsible for evaluating and determining the path of treatment.

Individuals seeking assistance will be asked if they are in possession of any weapons or drugs. If so, local law enforcement will be notified and will come to the safe station to take the custody of the items only.

The program is a cooperative effort by all levels of government.

Learn More View details
  • Topics:
    • Project: Opioid
    • Featured Opioid, Stimulant & Substance Abuse
  • Resource Type:
    • 1-pager/ summary/ infographic
  • Organizational Author:
    • External
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Supported by the Bureau of Justice Assistance's (BJA) Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program (COSSAP), the COSSAP Digest is a compilation of COSSAP-developed publications webinars, podcasts, and other information recently posted to the COSSAP Resource Center, as well as upcoming events.

Designed to equip the COSSAP community of practice with the latest tools to advance its ongoing support for colleagues, friends, family members, and neighbors professionally or personally addressing substance use disorders, entries are also searchable in the media library.

Invite others to receive COSSAP updates by sharing this link: cossapresources.org/subscription.

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Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) as part of the Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program (COSSAP)
Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) as part of the Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program (COSSAP)

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Jan Rader, fire chief in Huntington, West Virginia, shares their approach to opioid epidemic work fighting the opioid epidemic that's having an impact highlight ideas that are shaping our world. She's featured in the Emmy-winning Netflix documentary, "Heroin(e)." Rader helped establish quick response teams to visit and speak with patients within 72 hours of their overdose. She also helped start ProAct, a one-stop clinic for those suffering from substance abuse disorder, and is focused on self-care initiatives for first responders. Rader joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the programs impacting her community.